Office of Continuing Professional Education (OCPE)

Fri
28
Jun

Happy Endings for NJ's Unemployed: Grant-Funded Training Courses Provide Practical Skills & New Opportunities

Photo shows students in the Rutgers Professional Golf Turf Management School's Three-Week Preparatory Short Course learn about good golf course design in the field from legendary architect, Stephen Kay, at the Rutgers University Golf Course.

The first part of Sergio Sosa’s story is far too familiar: the Union City resident was inches away from earning his Master’s degree in Biology from Rutgers, and was transitioning from full-time student to full-time assistant-in-training at a golf course. Just when he thought everything was falling into place, Sosa was laid off from his job in late 2012.

Yet by March 2013, Sosa (with degree in hand) was gainfully employed as Assistant Superintendent at two popular New York City-owned golf courses.

Sosa credits the Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education (OCPE) and a grant from the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (DOL) for helping him get there.

Thu
20
Dec

Program Trains First Responders to Help Persons With Developmental Disabilities

First responders training on developmental disabilities

Retired Paterson Police Officer Larry Rudesyle recalls when words like ‘crazy’ and ‘retarded’ were used in dispatches to refer to a person behaving erratically.

First responders on the scene might shout at the person to stay still and physically subdue him if he didn’t – only to find out later that the behavior was a manifestation of a developmental disability.

Recently, television shows like Glee have crusaded to banish stereotypes that surround the developmentally disabled. Similarly, the New Jersey Legislature made a big push to improve first responders’ understanding about developmental disabilities and better handle encounters by passing a law in 2008 mandating training. The result was an online course for the state’s more than 100,000 police officers, firefighters and emergency medical services personnel.

Thu
25
Oct

Finishing What He Started: Cancer Can't Stop Golf Turf Management Student

Skip Douglass and Rosemary Mahoney

Keith ‘Skip’ Douglass gave up a coveted job as a golf course superintendent in Texas to enroll at The Rutgers Professional Golf Turf Management School last fall. Douglass and his wife had decided to relocate to Scottsdale, Ariz., and he wanted the prestige of having a Rutgers certificate to help him succeed in that golf mecca. So, he headed to New Brunswick in October 2011 to enter the first 10-week session of the program.

Douglass knew the Rutgers course would be intense, so when he felt exhausted after class each day, he chalked it up the stress of being in school after a more than 30-year hiatus. But as the weeks passed, he developed other symptoms – severe nosebleeds, bruising and night sweats. He blamed them on the moister climate.

It wasn’t until he completed the first 10-week session and headed back west and went to the doctor that he discovered why he was feeling so lousy. A bone marrow biopsy showed he had an unusual form of leukemia.

Thu
25
Oct

Environment & Public Health Program Puts Rutgers Grad on Track to Dream Job

Ruchi Pancholy

Even as an undergraduate, Ruchi Pancholy hit the ground running in her chosen field of public health, originally taking aim at the Big Apple.

From college intern on New York City’s trans-fat awareness campaign to post-graduation work on the city’s West Nile virus control program and a mental health services reimbursement program for 9/11 first responders, the 2005 Douglass College graduate has seen her fair share of public health initiatives.

Pancholy even tried an accelerated nursing program, but realized it wasn’t for her: Her interests lay in epidemiology, not direct patient care. 

The hard-working Burlington Township native contemplated her priorities and career options, and realized that her dream was to live in a tropical place and work on emerging infectious diseases in a global setting.

Unpublished
Tue
11
Aug

New State-of-the-Art Hands-On Radon Training Facility Built This Summer at Rutgers

Photo of new radon training facility

For over 25 years, the Eastern Regional Radon Training Center (ERRTC) at Rutgers University has been providing training in radon measurement and mitigation to professionals throughout the country. To improve the learning experience for students, the ERRTC opened a brand-new, state-of-the-art training facility on the Cook Campus in summer 2015.

“Watching the new radon training facility being built from the ground up has been really interesting,” said Program Coordinator Pamela Springard-Mayer.

The new facility was used for the first time by students attending the July 15 Radon Mitigation class.

In the past, the hands-on portions of the Rutgers three-day Radon Mitigation Proficiency Course were taught at Rutgers' Environmental Health and Safety Building (affectionately known as "the slab") on the Livingston Campus in Piscataway.

Tue
11
Aug

The (Environmental) Science of Investigation: Interactive Forensics Training Helps Environmental Professionals Solve Petroleum Contamination Cases

Photo of petroleum contamination investigation

When a site is contaminated with petroleum products, there are many questions. How did it happen? When did it happen? And, most importantly, who is responsible for paying to clean it up?

This fall, Rutgers University's Office of Continuing Professional Education (OCPE) will help professionals answer those questions in its completely revamped Environmental Forensics training course.

Designed for environmental consultants, attorneys, hazardous material emergency responders and professionals in related fields, the two-day class (September 9-10, 2015) will reveal the science behind the environmental forensics of petroleum and chlorinated hydrocarbon geochemistry. Students will also learn about new trends in professional investigations.

Thu
05
Dec

How to Lay a Concrete Paver Patio or Walkway: A Lifetime of Expert Tips & Shortcuts Shared in 2 Short Days

Tile image Students adding mortar to decorative paver wall

So you just installed a paver patio.  Stand back and admire your work.  It probably looks pretty decent right now.

But wait a few months. Or a year.  Let one good winter pass.  Now how does it look?

What Can Go Wrong When You Don’t Know What You’re Doing

“A lot of pavers look good when they first go in,” said Alex Burke, instructor in Rutgers’ Concrete Pavers class.  But when an installer doesn’t really know what he is doing, the ill effects will show within a year.  

“After you’ve gone through the winter and had time for settling, that’s when you start to see problems,” explained Burke.  “It might be frost heaving, settling or problems caused by difficult site conditions, like clay soil.”

Fri
18
Oct

Newark Mayor Cory Booker Honors OCPE's TEEM Gateway

Newark Mayor Cory Booker presented a Mayoral Proclamation

On October 1, Newark Mayor Cory Booker presented a Mayoral Proclamation to honor Rutgers T.E.E.M. Gateway as "one of the city's great organizations” for its work building productive futures for the at-risk youth of Newark and beyond. Proudly receiving the acknowledgment was Kenneth M. Karamichael, Director of T.E.E.M. Gateway, a division of the Office of Continuing Professional Education at Rutgers Cooperative Extension.

Watch this video to see the presentation of the Proclamation:

Mon
09
Sep

Functional Wetland Design: Why It Matters and 7 Tips for Wetland Construction Success

Photo of Rutgers wetland students learning out in the field.

The Wonders of Wetlands

Wetlands are essential components of our natural environment.  Providing shoreline protection, nursery for multiple freshwater and saltwater fishes, critical habitat for countless species of wildlife, storm water storage, nutrient filtration, sediment retention, niches that harbor unique species, shoreline protection and many other more subtle yet essential natural functions.  Legions of biologists, ecologists, and other scientists have studied and cataloged these diverse systems for decades.  

As the need to stem losses of these resources became more acute during the 1970’s and 1980’s, scientists endeavored to find ways in which degraded systems could be restored and new wetlands might be created.  These efforts led to some successful projects... and many not so successful projects. A few experts began to recognize that the failed sites typically had not adequately addressed replacement of hydrologic functions.

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