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Summer Classes At The Jersey Shore Would Be Popular, Rutgers Student Survey Shows

Head shot of a woman with sign that says, study at the shore this summer!

University will offer 17 courses on its first Jersey Shore menu

            NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. – Rutgers University-New Brunswick’s Summer Session, with more than 2,200 course sections, already one of the nation’s largest summer programs, is adding a new component with 17 courses at the Jersey Shore.

            The decision to establish “RU at the Shore” for 2015 was made following a survey of more than 4,500 undergraduates here, with 1,200 students – nearly 27 percent – indicating they would spend time along the 130-mile coastline and would be interested in taking classes for credit. Summer Session offers extensive internship and research/travel opportunities in addition to undergraduate and graduate courses in 250 fields.


Newark Mayor Cory Booker Honors OCPE's TEEM Gateway

Newark Mayor Cory Booker presented a Mayoral Proclamation

On October 1, Newark Mayor Cory Booker presented a Mayoral Proclamation to honor Rutgers T.E.E.M. Gateway as "one of the city's great organizations” for its work building productive futures for the at-risk youth of Newark and beyond. Proudly receiving the acknowledgment was Kenneth M. Karamichael, Director of T.E.E.M. Gateway, a division of the Office of Continuing Professional Education at Rutgers Cooperative Extension.

Watch this video to see the presentation of the Proclamation:


Rutgers Officially Forms Agreement with Mercer County Community College

Image of Patricia Donohue and Richard Novak signing papers

On May 30, a new partnership between Rutgers University and Mercer County Community College (MCCC) was formalized. The partnership, a function of Rutgers Off-Campus Programs will expand opportunities for associate degree holders in the Mercer County area to earn Rutgers degrees on MCCC’s West Windsor campus.

The Memorandum of Understanding signing ceremony was hosted by MCCC President Patricia Donohue and Interim Vice President for Continuing Studies Richard Novak. The event was attended by state and county officials and MCCC and Rutgers academic administrators and staff.

“This initiative is designed to meet the needs of thousands of community college graduates who traditionally have faced great difficulty in transferring to a baccalaureate completion program. It recognizes the need for flexible options, such as online and hybrid courses, for those who have work and family obligations,” said Novak.


Checklist That Helps Towns Prepare for ‘Sandy-style’ Calamity Issued by Rutgers’ Center for Government Services

Flooded neighborhood

NEW BRUNSWICK – Last December, 30 municipal managers, many from towns battered by Hurricane Sandy and the November Nor’ Easter, gathered in New Brunswick to share experiences and lessons learned from dealing with two of the most devastating natural disasters in New Jersey history.

In that forum, sponsored by Rutgers’ Center for Government Services (CGS), participants candidly discussed their towns’ responses to the myriad and colossal problems and issues created by these historic storms and their aftermath.

The peer-group discussions and recommendations from that day were collected and distilled in a new pamphlet published this month by CGS for state and municipal leaders. Entitled, “Lessons Learned: Reflecting Upon Hurricane Sandy and the November Nor-Easter,” the publication provides a detailed checklist for preparing for, dealing with, and recovering from future “Sandy-style” disasters.


Rutgers Firmly Planted on Central Park Turf

Image of a man in central park on a ride on mower

Rutgers University's bond with Central Park is as strong as the hardy grass a Rutgers professor plucked from Sheep Meadow in the1960s and cultivated into world-class turf.

Rutgers and the Central Park Conservancy, a non-profit organization responsible for the restoration, maintenance and enhancement of the iconic park in Manhattan, have strengthened their collective expertise in horticulture and turf care ever since through years of collaboration and training.

"The partnership between Rutgers and the Central Park Conservancy is preparing the next generation of environmental stewards with the tools to manage landscapes and help them flourish," said Douglas Blonsky CC'83 , president and chief executive officer of CPC – and a Rutgers graduate.


One-Day Program to Address Hazards of Flood-Damaged Buildings

Image of a water flooded town

If Hurricane Sandy and its recent winter cousin, Nemo, taught New Jersey anything, it was that preparing for the worst is not an option, but a necessity in an era of extreme weather events. And learning what to do after disaster strikes is time well spent.
Months after Hurricane Sandy pounded New Jersey, many people are just starting to deal with the clean-up and rebuilding of their flooded homes and businesses. The health hazards associated with water-damaged buildings are numerous, ranging from the obvious – mold and electrical concerns – to the less well known – asbestos contamination and dangers of microbial agents and pathogenic viruses.


Registration Underway for Nondegree Study at Rutgers during Spring 2013

Tile image of a building surrounded by trees in the fall

Registration is underway for individuals interested in nondegree study at Rutgers during the Spring 2013 semester. Online registrations are being accepted through January 23, and in-person registration is possible through January 25. Complete details are available at

Working adults looking to jump-start their careers or gain new skills and knowledge, students attending other institutions, and qualified high school students can take Rutgers courses in New Brunswick on a nondegree basis during the fall and spring semesters through the Division of Continuing Studies.

The division offers the opportunity for nondegree graduate and undergraduate study during the fall and spring semesters. Students attend classes and complete coursework alongside matriculated Rutgers students. Tuition and fees are billed per credit hour.


Rutgers Officially Opens Lifelong Learning Center at Atlantic Cape Community College

Rutgers officially opened its new Lifelong Learning Center on the campus of Atlantic Cape Community College in Mays Landing at a ribbon-cutting ceremony on September 28 hosted by Rutgers President Robert L. Barchi and Atlantic Cape President Peter Mora. More than 200 guests attended the event.

The two-story, 22,000-square-foot facility enables Rutgers to expand academic opportunities for students from Atlantic, Cape May and surrounding counties who hold associate degrees and wish to earn Rutgers degrees – close to where they live or work – in such popular disciplines as psychology and criminal justice.

“This splendid building demonstrates our strong relationship with Atlantic Cape as well as Rutgers’ commitment to address the growing educational demands of this region,” said Barchi.


American Ballet Theatre Opens Children’s Division at Mason Gross School of the Arts

Credit: Rosalie O'Connor

The Mason Gross Extension Division has partnered with the acclaimed American Ballet Theatre to open a satellite branch of their Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School Children’s Division on the Douglass Campus in New Brunswick.

An open house for the program and for all Extension Division classes takes place Saturday, Sept. 8, 2012; free sample classes will be offered. Classes officially begin Saturday, Sept. 15, 2012, and run through Jan. 19, 2013. All fall-semester ABT/JKO students receive $100 off registration. Registration is open now.

Barbara Bashaw, graduate director of the EdM program in Dance Education at Mason Gross, says the JKO school not only provides rigorous training; it exposes young dancers “to a vast repertoire of classics, internationally acclaimed performers as role models and the opportunity to become a part of ballet culture, not just ballet classes.”


Rutgers’ New Facility at Atlantic Cape to Welcome Students

Courtesy of Atlantic Cape Community College

As Susan and Ashley Rivenbark begin classes as new Rutgers students this month, they are among the first to walk through the doors of the university’s new Lifelong Learning Center on the campus of Atlantic Cape Community College in Mays Landing.

The Rivenbarks – mother and daughter – are starting the next phase of their college careers as students in Rutgers’ off-campus degree-completion program. Both received their associate’s degrees from Atlantic Cape last spring and were admitted to Rutgers’ program there. Susan plans to complete her bachelor’s degree in liberal studies and Ashley in psychology. They will be among 300 students projected to enroll at that site this fall.

As residents of nearby Hammonton, they see the new facility as a draw for other like-minded individuals wishing to complete their degrees.

“I think it will attract many new people like me from the area who are looking for a great opportunity closer to home,” said Ashley.


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