Degree Completion

Wed
26
Jul

Asbury Park: Rutgers Course Charts Seaside City’s Ups and Downs

Class on a tour of Asbury Park, NJ

Read more at Rutgers Today.

Tue
21
Feb

Q&A With Governor Tom Kean

Governor Thomas Kean

Reflections on the 30-Year Success of the Alternative Route Teaching Program

Before this program “Einstein could not have taught math in New Jersey” on the K-12 level"

Just over 30 years ago, Governor Tom Kean proposed landmark education reform through the Alternative Route Certification Program, which radically changed existing teacher training and certification laws.  The legislation allowed those with a bachelor’s degree in key subject areas to shorten the route to teacher certification and eliminate many education course requirements. This program is now an integral part of not just the New Jersey teacher employment system, but also is employed in many states nationwide.

Kean, who was the state’s 48thGovernor and is known worldwide for his role as chairman of the 9/11 Commission, reflects on the success of the Alternative Route Certification Program.

How did you know that this idea and the resulting legislation would be so successful?

Mon
16
May

Atlantic Cape Community College and Rutgers University–Camden Sign Conditional Acceptance Agreement

Atlantic Cape Community College and Rutgers University–Camden Sign Conditional Acceptance Agreement

Atlantic Cape Community College and Rutgers University–Camden signed a Conditional Acceptance Agreement May 11, allowing students to complete three years of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree at Atlantic Cape and seamlessly transfer to Rutgers–Camden for completion.The 3+1 agreement allows students to pay the lower tuition and fees at Atlantic Cape for an additional year, a savings of more than $20,000, before transferring to the Rutgers School of Nursing–Camden.

Mon
05
Oct

Where Were You At 62? Court Reporter Finds Her Own Words Through Rutgers Degree Earned Off Campus

Patricia Florio of the Rutgers Class of 2005

Patricia Florio spent an entire career as a court reporter writing other people’s statements.

But all along, the writer inside of her wanted to put her own words down on paper.

And at age 62, when many contemporaries were calculating Social Security payouts, Florio earned her bachelor’s degree through Rutgers Off Campus Programs to help launch her second career as a writer.

When she worked in federal court in Brooklyn, N.Y., Florio had to painstakingly assure that every word was recorded correctly, for legal purposes. “On the job, and through someone who proofed my work, I learned how to become a perfectionist,” said Florio. “And that is very much required when you're a court reporter.”

Florio also had experience as a freelance newspaper reporter, giving her the background to launch her writing career. But she felt she needed the confidence that a college degree would provide.

Tue
22
Sep

A Minor, In Time: International Student Stays on Course in Winter Session

For the 3,400 international students in Rutgers’s diverse student body, online courses taken during summer and winter terms enable them to be in two places at once.

Hailing from more than 115 countries, international students use online courses to hurdle time and distance barriers to complete required courses, pursue a minor, or chase other academic goals.

Bhagyawati Sanghani is one of those. She’s an international student who took a class even though she traveled back home to India over winter break.

Taking an online class -- remotely from her family’s home – as part of Winter Session at Rutgers University-New Brunswick allowed her to graduate with a minor in Public Health in May 2015. That minor rounded out her degree in Biological Sciences from the School of Environmental & Biological Sciences.

Mon
06
Jul

First Rutgers Off Campus Grad in Public Health Takes the Long Road

Rutgers Off Campus Programs at Atlantic Cape Community College

Mishi Resian’s life journey has taken her from a village in Kenya, to U.S. Army bases in Germany and New Jersey, to deployment in Iraq as an Army combat medic, and then to community college near her home in Galloway Township, N.J. near Atlantic City.

But no path has been more important to her than the walk for her Rutgers diploma.

In May 2015, Resian graduated as the first-ever student in the Center for Off Campus Programs in the Rutgers Division of Continuing Studies to earn a Bachelor of Science in Public Health degree from the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy.

Taking all those roads, her commute by contrast seems easy: While she is an Off Campus student, Resian chose for the past two years to drive the 100 miles from Galloway to New Brunswick to take all classes for her major in person. This semester, she also took three classes at the Rutgers Off Campus Programs location at Atlantic Cape Community College in Mays Landing, close to her home.

Fri
29
May

Rutgers-New Brunswick Summer Classes Kick Off; Enrollment Equals Nearly One-Third Of Undergraduates

Image of four lady's looking at a schedule

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. – Rutgers University-New Brunswick’ s Summer Session kicked off this week with nearly 14,000 enrollments in more than 2,300 course sections for one of the nation’s largest summer higher educational programs. The number of students enrolled totals nearly one-third of the New Brunswick undergraduate population.

The 10,541 students enrolled in Summer Session make up 33 percent of the New Brunswick-Piscataway undergraduate student body of more than 32,000.

Rutgers Summer Session has drawn strong interest from students seeking science courses, visiting students and students who combine work and school. “We’re seeing strong enrollments in a wide range of academic fields from a diverse body of students,” noted Elizabeth Beasley, director of Rutgers-New Brunswick Summer Session, a unit of Rutgers Division of Continuing Studies (DoCS). “Students who work while attending Rutgers and those with a double-major course load turn to Summer Session in significant numbers to keep on pace toward graduation.

Wed
15
Apr

Rutgers begins offering summer courses at the Jersey Shore

Summer is approaching, which means sandy beaches, bathing suits and ... textbooks. The Jersey Shore is set to be more than a vacation destination this summer.

For the first time, Rutgers University is offering summer classes at the beach, called RU at the Shore.

Instead of paperback novels, Rutgers students might be bringing textbooks as their beach reading. The university will host 17 new undergraduate courses in Atlantic City, Cape May and Point Pleasant Beach.

Read more at newsworks.org

Fri
10
Apr

Summer Classes At The Jersey Shore Would Be Popular, Rutgers Student Survey Shows

Head shot of a woman with sign that says, study at the shore this summer!

University will offer 17 courses on its first Jersey Shore menu

            NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. – Rutgers University-New Brunswick’s Summer Session, with more than 2,200 course sections, already one of the nation’s largest summer programs, is adding a new component with 17 courses at the Jersey Shore.

            The decision to establish “RU at the Shore” for 2015 was made following a survey of more than 4,500 undergraduates here, with 1,200 students – nearly 27 percent – indicating they would spend time along the 130-mile coastline and would be interested in taking classes for credit. Summer Session offers extensive internship and research/travel opportunities in addition to undergraduate and graduate courses in 250 fields.

Fri
31
May

Rutgers Officially Forms Agreement with Mercer County Community College

Image of Patricia Donohue and Richard Novak signing papers

On May 30, a new partnership between Rutgers University and Mercer County Community College (MCCC) was formalized. The partnership, a function of Rutgers Off-Campus Programs will expand opportunities for associate degree holders in the Mercer County area to earn Rutgers degrees on MCCC’s West Windsor campus.

The Memorandum of Understanding signing ceremony was hosted by MCCC President Patricia Donohue and Interim Vice President for Continuing Studies Richard Novak. The event was attended by state and county officials and MCCC and Rutgers academic administrators and staff.

“This initiative is designed to meet the needs of thousands of community college graduates who traditionally have faced great difficulty in transferring to a baccalaureate completion program. It recognizes the need for flexible options, such as online and hybrid courses, for those who have work and family obligations,” said Novak.

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