Become Certified in Government Technology Leadership: Advance Your Career with CGCIO™ Certification

Leadership

Rutgers Center for Government Services has joined forces with Public Technology Institute to offer PTI's highly regarded leadership training program for government technology professionals. Year-long classes that address the most critical issues facing IT leadership in the public sector begin in New Brunswick, N.J., on June 28, 2017, and in Los Angeles, Calif., on July 26, 2017. The deadline to enroll in the east coast program is May 31, with first-come, first-served enrollment capped at 20 seats. Do not delay.

This nationally recognized program is designed to equip technology professionals with the requisite tools to improve their leadership skills so that they may best manage their organizational technology and personnel assets. The program allows graduates to earn one of two coveted designations: Certified Government Chief Information Officer™ or Certified in Government Technology Leadership™.

Having a CGCIO™ or CGTL™ certification demonstrates a higher level of practical skills and knowledge for managing technology in a constantly changing environment. To that end, the program allows participants, as they near completion of the year-long program and are preparing their capstone projects, to choose the track that is most meaningful to them in their career—to become a Certified Government CIO or Certified in Government Technology Leadership. This flexibility is something that participants value quite highly.

Public Technology Institute, based in Washington, D.C., is a technology organization that actively supports local government executives and elected officials through research, education, executive-level consulting services and national recognition programs. PTI Executive Director and CEO Alan R. Shark developed the program and began offering it in 2009 to rave reviews. Shark, who is also an associate professor of practice at Rutgers University School of Public Affairs and Administration, will lead the CGCIO™ certification course.

"Having a CGCIO™ certification shows a personal commitment to both the technology and the government profession," said Shark. "Participating in this course requires the student to keep abreast of the latest technology, management and leadership skills necessary to be effective. In addition, many local governments now look for this certification when filling director-level job openings."

Rutgers Center for Government Services takes its mission to improve the knowledge, competency and professionalism of state and local government officials and employees very seriously, so partnering with PTI on this certification program was a natural fit. CGS Director Alan Zalkind, an advocate of lifelong learning, vetted the program and appreciates how it facilitates the often-overlooked link between technical and administrative skills.

"It's important to produce leaders who are equally adept at ensuring a system's technological safety and providing top-notch personnel support services," Zalkind said, noting that he believes the program is germane to both the public and private sector.

During the course of the twelve-month program that includes a total of 240 contact hours (including monthly on-line classes, three in-person classes, online coursework, virtual discussion classes and a capstone project), participants focus on a number of key areas, including IT governance, project management, change management, leadership, emotional intelligence, cyber security, risk assessment, communicating for results and assessing organizational effectiveness.

Students range from deputy and current CIOs to mid- to high-level IT professionals and the classes are streamlined so that even the busiest students can excel in the program. Tuition is competitively priced to cost less than most classes taught at major universities and there is a discount for officials with PTI member governments.

Graduates who earn their CGCIO™ designation must complete a total of 60 contact hours every three years to qualify for re-certification. William Mann, Chief Information Officer for the Borough of West Chester, Pa., was one of the program's initial graduates and he has since earned two re-certifications.

"The CGCIO™ course and certification has not only provided me with a great amount of knowledge but helped me to consider new ideas and very importantly gave me the confidence to think of myself as a true innovation leader for my organization,” Mann said. “Another true advantage with the CGCIO™ certification is that it demonstrates to your peers, upper management and elected officials that you have earned a very specific certification in respect to information technology, innovation and leadership which is incredibly important in government today.”

Recent graduates shared their feedback with Alan Shark. "Through the program I was able to deepen my technology and management skills in multiple facets of the profession. Sharing experiences, missteps and successes with fellow technologists and IT leaders was deeply rewarding and very useful in my current role as CIO," wrote Chief Information Officer – Information Technology for the City of Fort Collins, Colo., Dan Coldiron.

Technology Manager for the City of Novato, Calif., Scott Sanders said, "The CGCIO program has been one of the most challenging and rewarding programs I’ve participated in. The staff, coursework and fellow cohort members have proven to be a great resource to me."

Technology Director for Milltown (N.J.) Public Schools Tafari Anderson, noted, "The course has been an amazing experience and [provided me with] a wealth of knowledge that I am looking forward to sharing with my colleagues across the state."

Chief Technology Officer for the Town of Enfield, Conn., Paul A. Russell explained, "It was a great experience, one that I strongly recommend for anyone looking to advance to the management side of technology."

Join those who have taken this next step to advance their careers. Register by May 31, 2017, at www.pti.org or email Dale Bowen at dbowen at pti.org.

 

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