Zimmerli Art Museum Offers Teacher Workshop for Non-art Classroom

Butterfly on a typed page

The Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers offers a variety of workshops throughout the year to equip educators with the professional development opportunities needed to integrate art and aspects of the museum into the curriculum. This fall, the museum welcomes artist and educator Brian Bomeisler to lead the teacher workshop “Two Ways of Knowing: Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain” on Friday, October 19, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The workshop is based on the legendary 1979 book “Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain,” by Betty Edwards, which used the terms L-Mode and R-Mode to designate two ways of knowing and seeing: the verbal, analytic mode and the visual, perceptual mode, respectively.

Most activities require both modes, however, drawing is one of a few activities that require mainly one mode, without interference from the other. Learning to draw turns out not to be "learning to draw," but learning to make a mental shift from L-mode to R-mode. Once learned, drawing can be used to record what one sees either in reality or in the mind's eye, in a manner not unlike recording thoughts and ideas in words.

Teachers in the humanities and the sciences can discover the remarkable applications of drawing in the non-arts classroom with Bomeisler, who has been teaching alongside Betty Edwards, his mother, since 1988. Since her retirement in 1998, he has been leading the Drawing and Painting Workshops that Edwards developed.

The fee is $50 per teacher, which includes continental breakfast, lunch, and supplies. Participants also receive six professional development credits. For more information, visit the Zimmerli Museum's website for educators, or contact the Education Department at education@zimmerli.rutgers.edu. This workshop is offered in collaboration with the Zimmerli’s special exhibition “Art=Text=Art: Works by Contemporary Artists.”

The Zimmerli Art Museum is located at 71 Hamilton Street on the College Avenue campus of Rutgers in New Brunswick.

Image: Four Ways to Blue, Jane Hammond

 

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